Tehran: unfair trial held for two political prisoners

Mar 07
  • Print
Political prisoners, Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule and Puriya Ibrahimi
Political prisoners, Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule and Puriya Ibrahimi

By Staff Writer, Iran Probe
Monday, 7 March 2016

The trial of two political prisoners, Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule and Puriya Ibrahimi was held in branch 26 of the so-called court in Tehran, chaired by Ahmadzadeh and with the presence of Judge Salavati, along with representatives and interrogators from the notorious Ministry of Intelligence (MOIS/VEVAK) and the regime’s prosecutor’s office. These two had been arrested with another individual by the MOIS on 9 June 2015 in the city of Rudhan, and later transferred to Evin Prison.

The charges raised against political prisoner Puriya Ibrahimi are propaganda against the state, forming a group to assassinate Judge Salavati, assembly and collusion against national security, connections with foreign media outlets, sending false news reports, and having connections with the families of political and civil prisoners.

The charges raised against Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule have been stated as propaganda against the state and assembly and collusion against national security.

On March 1st, the Amnesty International urged Iranian authorities to quash the torture-tainted convictions of filmmaker Hossein Rajabian, his brother Mehdi Rajabian and Yousef Emadi, both musicians.

Said Boumedouha, Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa Deputy Director  blamed Iranian authorities for crackdown on freedom of expression saying, ‘These sentences lay bare the absurdity of Iran’s criminal justice system, which brands individuals as criminals merely for peacefully exercising their rights to freedom of expression through making music and films. These young men should never have been arrested, let alone brought to trial.’

A Revolutionary Court in April 2015 sentenced these three men to six years in prison after only a three-minute trial (!) charging them for “insulting Islamic sanctities, “spreading propaganda against the system” and “illegal audio-visual activities”.

Furthermore, the Iranian regime continue to execute minors. On March 2nd, an Iranian regime court sentenced Amir Amrollahi to death for the second time, after a retrial and following a decade in prison. The court rejected the conclusion of an official forensic report which had said he had not attained “mental growth and maturity” at the time of the crime, in November 2005, when he was 16 years old.

Last month, Amnesty International published its annual report saying, ‘Scores of juvenile offenders remained on death row. Several juvenile offenders were re-sentenced to death after receiving a retrial pursuant to the new juvenile sentencing guidelines of the 2013 Islamic Penal Code.’

 

The trial of two political prisoners, Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule and Puriya Ibrahimi was held in branch 26 of the so-called court in Tehran, chaired by Ahmadzadeh and with the presence of Judge Salavati, along with representatives and interrogators from the notorious Ministry of Intelligence (MOIS/VEVAK) and the regime’s prosecutor’s office. These two had been arrested with another individual by the MOIS on 9 June 2015 in the city of Rudhan, and later transferred to Evin Prison.

The charges raised against political prisoner Puriya Ibrahimi are propaganda against the state, forming a group to assassinate Judge Salavati, assembly and collusion against national security, connections with foreign media outlets, sending false news reports, and having connections with the families of political and civil prisoners.

The charges raised against Ms. Shokufe Azarmanesh Masule have been stated as propaganda against the state and assembly and collusion against national security.

On March 1st, the Amnesty International urged Iranian authorities to quash the torture-tainted convictions of filmmaker Hossein Rajabian, his brother Mehdi Rajabian and Yousef Emadi, both musicians.

Said Boumedouha, Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa Deputy Director  blamed Iranian authorities for crackdown on freedom of expression saying, ‘These sentences lay bare the absurdity of Iran’s criminal justice system, which brands individuals as criminals merely for peacefully exercising their rights to freedom of expression through making music and films. These young men should never have been arrested, let alone brought to trial.’

A Revolutionary Court in April 2015 sentenced these three men to six years in prison after only a three-minute trial (!) charging them for “insulting Islamic sanctities, “spreading propaganda against the system” and “illegal audio-visual activities”.

Furthermore, the Iranian regime continue to execute minors. On March 2nd, an Iranian regime court sentenced Amir Amrollahi to death for the second time, after a retrial and following a decade in prison. The court rejected the conclusion of an official forensic report which had said he had not attained “mental growth and maturity” at the time of the crime, in November 2005, when he was 16 years old.

Last month, Amnesty International published its annual report saying, ‘Scores of juvenile offenders remained on death row. Several juvenile offenders were re-sentenced to death after receiving a retrial pursuant to the new juvenile sentencing guidelines of the 2013 Islamic Penal Code.’
Tagged under
Published in News

External Links

Two Misguided Reports

  • HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH Report
    HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH Report
    On 18 May 2005, the US based Human Rights Watch (“HRW”) issued a 28-page report (“the HRW Report”) concerning the People's Mojahedin Organisation of Iran (“PMOI / MEK”).  Entitled ‘No Exit: Human Rights Abuses Inside the MKO Camps’, the HRW Report was essentially based on 12 hours of telephone interviews with 12…
  • Courting Disaster, A response to Rand report on People’s Mujahedin Organization of Iran
    Courting Disaster, A response to Rand report on People’s Mujahedin Organization of Iran
    The RAND National Defense Research Institute published in July 2009 the report The Mujahedin-e Khalq: A Policy Conundrum for the Multi-National Force-Iraq, Task Force 134 (Detainee Operations). The report focuses on the circumstances surrounding the detention of the Mujahedin-e Khalq (MeK) at Camp Ashraf and “whether MeK members were taken into custody…